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  • Abby Wormsbaker

'Tis the Season to Be Horrified


As we inch closer and closer to Halloween, the annual traditions of pumpkin carving and scary movie watching continue.


Originally inspired from Gothic novels, the horror genre of film was made for the sole purpose of terrifying an audience and reaching a new level of terror. The supernatural first made its appearance in short silent films created by Georges Méliès, a French filmmaker, in the late 1890s. It wasn't until the silent era had given way to the technological process that we began to see the rise of monster movies like Frankenstein and Dracula. With decades to follow, we see similar work inspired from Méliès into what we eventually know today.


When most people think of horror movies, especially in today's day, "cheesy" or "scary" usually are the top two words of choice when it comes to describing a particular film. It wasn't until the 1970s when the genre itself became more popular with The Exorcist and Poltergeist, however, it was not until horror movies made from this period up until the late '90s or early 2000's that we began to see horror movies as a really scary piece of work.


The horror industry is on thin ice most of the time with mostly filming remakes and reboots. The question of what originality has to offer a modern audience is often up in the air. In recent years, on top of the remakes we have seen like Halloween, there have been very few original horror storylines that truly terrified its audience. The horror genre is a very special genre; it gives the opportunity for creativity to soar in darkness. A frightful ending may bring a powerful storyline.


Horror movies are just as important as any other genre. The films help us to release anxiety and fear that we keep deep inside our conscious.


Feeling scared is easy, but being scared is better: Hereditary, Climax, Sinister, The Cabin In The Woods, Midsommar, The Killing of a Sacred Deer, The Babadook, I Saw The Devil, and It Follows.

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