A Professor's Perspective on COVID-19

By Nathan Mayer

Covid-19 has turned our worlds upside down, and it’s made a lot of students worry about their education. Dr. Krisstal Clayton, a psychology professor at the University of North Texas spoke to us about the coronavirus and how she feels that switching to an online form of teaching has affected both our students and faculty.

She wants students that are wary about the new way of teaching to know that, “we understand this is a whole new way of learning but that doesn’t mean that we still can’t give you quality.” Dr. Clayton says that she thinks because of this situation students and faculty are placed in, it has forced everyone to adapt yet she feels that it “helps us have a little grace for one another.”


With the pandemic hitting hard in regions across the US, there have been shelter in place and stay-at-home warnings which has made people feel disconnected from the world and each other. She recommends that now is a good time to make sure that people stay in touch with one another, and that they connect so that nobody feels isolated and alone. Setting up a Zoom conference with friends or facetiming grandparents is a great way to not only hear other people’s voices, but to see their faces as well, and that can really make a difference in lonely times like these.


Dr. Clayton also says that students should, “find some normalcy.” She says to plan out your days and do things in a fashion that you normally would as if you were at school. This will help the brain stay focused on what needs to be accomplished for academic studies. She also provided some useful tools that students should take advantage of in order to help them stay on track with their academic goals. She recommends the Google Calendar app to help students keep track of assignment due dates; the Grammarly app to help students with their grammar and word choice especially since everything is now online; and the Canvas app to help keep track of assignments and get reminders when instructors post something new.


She says that her goal, whether it be in a face-to-face or online form of teaching is to ultimately teach her students “how to think, not what to think.”


UNT has many resources available for students so if anyone is feeling as though they need help, do not hesitate to reach out. Remember that we are all in this together and that we will make it through this as long as we stay smart and stay safe.